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I work in a center that provides detailed quality packs to some of our clients each month. The question I have is what is the industry standard ratio of calls that should be monitored per client? Is it 10% of all calls? 5%?

I work in a center that provides detailed quality packs to some of our clients each month. The question I have is what is the industry standard ratio of calls that should be monitored per client? Is it 10% of all calls? 5%?

10/21/2007

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Question
I work in a center that provides detailed quality packs to some of our clients each month. The question I have is what is the industry standard ratio of calls that should be monitored per client? Is it 10% of all calls? 5%?

Answer
There is no industry standard for the ratio of calls that should be monitored per month. The amount varies based on total number of agents, type of contact center (multi-channel, multi-skill) and call volume. For contact centers that receive 40,000 plus calls per month, a monitoring ratio of 10% or even 5% would equate to a range of 2,000 to over 4,000 evaluations per month, which would be a large and, likely, unmanageable task. (Consider the number of supervisors and/or QA specialists that would be required to handle this volume.)

The goal of a quality monitoring program is to provide a statistically significant analysis of service delivery and the quality of customer interactions. To accurately measure service quality and establish credibility and reliability for the quality monitoring process, randomly captured calls should be evaluated consistently for all agents, on a regular basis. Rather than focusing on a percentage of calls, management generally decides how many calls/emails/chat sessions to evaluate on a weekly and monthly basis in order to obtain a statistically relevant sample that’s not too onerous for supervisors and quality reviewers—if asked to review too many interactions, they will never reach their goals. It’s also important to ensure that the quality criteria (QA evaluation forms) capture and measure relevant performance metrics, based on a balance of customer and business priorities.

Here is a trick that some contact centers use to determine the number of evaluations to monitor per agent/month. I suggest that you start by evaluating 10 calls per agent for a month to obtain a baseline figure. Each subsequent month, reduce the number of evaluations for each agent by 1 and compare the results/findings to the prior month. Continue this process until the variance between the results is significant. At that point, you will have gone as low as you can.

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