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We are implementing a post-call survey for customers who call our care center for various questions. We intend to identify improvements to our people/processes/technology by doing this. Any ideas that you can share on making this successful would be much appreciated.

We are implementing a post-call survey for customers who call our care center for various questions. We intend to identify improvements to our people/processes/technology by doing this. Any ideas that you can share on making this successful would be much appreciated.

1/8/2011

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Question
We are implementing a post-call survey for customers who call our care center for various questions. We intend to identify improvements to our people/processes/technology by doing this. Any ideas that you can share on making this successful would be much appreciated.

Answer

Gathering survey feedback is useful only if the organization analyzes the results and applies what it learns. Most companies that implement contact center survey/feedback programs do so with the intention of acting on the feedback. However, few companies ultimately apply the findings to drive changes in policies, procedures or products/services. Asking customers for their input but failing to act on the information is one of the most critical missteps an organization can make. It’s also a waste of high-value information, as customers often see things that companies do not.

One way to correct this issue is to appoint a customer advocate or champion who is responsible for ensuring that customer feedback drives change and action throughout an organization. This advocate (or a team) should be charged with analyzing results and converting the findings into action. Ideally, the customer advocate should be well positioned within the organization and able to influence managers to make the necessary changes. The advocate should have a formal process for applying survey findings on a timely basis, before customers become alienated and turn to social media applications to express their dissatisfaction. The advocate or team should be empowered to take immediate remedial action to correct any problem, anywhere in the organization. The formal process should include the following: a project plan, identification of the department(s) and person/people responsible for acting on each issue that needs resolution, a communication plan to inform employees and customers that changes have been or are being made, and a tool for tracking the progress of the change(s).

Another element that must be addressed is survey responses with really poor ratings. When a customer takes the time to provide information, more often than not they want the company to respond and fix their problem(s). You will need processes that enable your organization to respond to these types of situations in near-real time. Listening to customers and acting quickly to resolve their issues distinguishes an enterprise from its competitors by helping to create a culture of customer-centricity.

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